Ayurveda In Nepal: free lecture

Ayurveda In Nepal: free lecture

I was introduced to the Bajracharya medical tradition of Nepal by my colleague Alan Tillotson, author of the highly acclaimed One Earth Herbal Sourcebook. Alan had met the late Dr. Mana Bajra Bajracharya somewhat by chance when he traveled to Nepal in the early 1970s, suffering from the effects of poorly controlled type 1 diabetes. Through Dr. Mana's skill Alan was restored to health, and since that time, Alan maintained an ongoing relationship with Dr. Mana until his death in 2001. Known locally and internationally for his healing skills, Dr. Mana authored over 40 books on Ayurveda, and in 2000, Alan asked me to help with the publication of these works. In 2009, I finally traveled to Nepal to meet Dr. Mana's son, Vaidya Madhu, and shortly thereafter we published the first of Dr. Mana's work as Ayurveda In Nepal. This book is detailed compendium of the traditional theories and practices employed by Dr Mana, drawing from the 800 year old medical tradition that he inherited as part of … [Read more...]

Putting an end to seasonal allergies

Putting an end to seasonal allergies

I am fortunate to live on the edge of Pacific Spirit Park, and on my daily walks through the forest with my dogs, I have been noticing the unmistakable signs that spring is on its way. Not just the crocuses, snowdrops and burgeoning cherry blossoms in my neighborhood, but taking advantage of the open forest canopy of late winter, the leaf buds of bushes such as elderberry and salmonberry are just starting to open. With climate change being exacerbated by El Nino, the early arrival of spring in much of North America and Europe is welcome respite from a long cold winter, but at the same time, brings with it the dread of seasonal hay fever sufferers. Beginning around now, trees including alder, birch, aspen and poplar begin to pollinate, followed later in spring as it warms up by grass, weeds and mould spores. As a (former) long time allergy sufferer myself I have a lot of compassion for those of you that suffer from seasonal hay fever. But at the same, I experience considerable … [Read more...]

New semester begins March 23

New semester begins March 23

Happy new year! Let us all hope that 2016 brings us all closer to good health and happiness. To that end, we are delighted to announce that the Spring semester at the DSBM begins in March, with Inside Ayurveda starting on March 23rd, and Food As Medicine on March 24th. Please scroll down for more details. Ayurveda Summit Last fall I was asked to be part of the Ayurveda Summit, and was interviewed by Dr. Eric Grasser on the application of Ayurveda in every day life. You can still access these recordings, but if you missed them, here is some of the feedback: Thank you Todd – you provided deep insight and ignited my curiosity. My earlier revelation from my day about ayurveda was…"Ayurveda is designed to maximize your potential in all aspects of life; to enhance your ability to do what you are here to do; to connect you with your highest expression of your unique gifts. Ayurveda is the Ultimate User's Manual for Resilience." I feel that you confirmed what I was sensing. What a gift Tod … [Read more...]

Canadian dollar blues?

Canadian dollar blues?

If you are Canadian, you just might have noticed that the CAN$ is tanking against the US$, and as such, the relative cost of our courses has risen significantly. To help out our Canadian students, we are temporarily offering both Inside Ayurveda and Food As Medicine at par with the US dollar. To register, please use the following links: Inside Ayurveda link, for Canadian students only Food As Medicine link, for Canadian students only This offer is available to Canadian citizens that register with a valid Canadian address. … [Read more...]

Āyurveda, diet, and psychosis

Āyurveda, diet, and psychosis

After my recent post on Vegetarianism and Ayurveda, I received a question from a reader, who was curious about why I said that in Āyurveda, there is scant reference to the preferment of a vegetarian diet as a therapeutic tool, except for the disease of unmāda (psychosis). To explain myself better, I want to provide a little background on the disease to provide some more context. The term unmāda is derived from the Sanskrit root words ud, meaning ‘upwards’, and mad, which refers to the capacity to ‘excite' or ‘exhilarate’. According to Āyurveda the life force called prāṇa is received by the body not just through the lungs and digestive system, but also through the top of the head. This prāṇic energy descends downwards to guide the formation and maintenance of our bodies, connecting through our feet to the earth, from a state of etheric potentiality to one of physical manifestation. This energetic flow is symbolized by the downward-pointing triangle, representing the feminine principle … [Read more...]